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on house speaker john boehner. speaker boehner a key republican and after his meeting with geithner this morning, boehner said these urgent talks haven't moved forward in two weeks. keep in mind, they need to get it done by january 1st and here's boehner getting grumpy with cnn's kate baldwin. take a look. >> to this point, most -- most public statements have been optimistic, confident, hopeful. we're all sensing a very different tone from you right now. are you walking away from talks? have things completely broken down, mr. speaker? >> no, no, no. stop. i got to tell you. i'm disappointed in where we are and disappointed in what's happened over the last couple of weeks. but going over the fiscal cliff is serious business. and i'm here seriously trying to resolve it. and i would hope the white house would get serious, as well. >> all right. so once again, here are the cliff notes right here. republicans on the hill are demanding trillions of dollars worth of debt reduction. that's pretty much fine with democrats who say the wealthy should foot the bill in the form of higher tax rat
's go to washington. john boehner is reswrekting the president's michelle proposal involving the fiscal cliff. let's lisp in. >> the president in the coming days. during the campaign the president pledged to american people that he would seek a balanced approach to addressing the debt with a combination of new revenues and spending cuts. the day after the election i said the republican majority would accept new revenue as part of a balanced approach that includes real spending cuts and reforms. now, the white house took three weeks to respond with any kind of a proposal, and much to my disappointment, it wasn't a serious one. still, i'm willing to move forward in good faith. our original framework still stands. instead of raising tax rates, we can produce similar amount of revenue, reforming the tax code to close loopholes and lower tax rates. it's far better for the economy when the american people paver on that approach by 2-1. they favor it eep more when we can also show them that real spending cuts will, in fact, reduce the deficit. now, there have been many conversations over the l
's in a meeting with house speaker john boehner and mitch mcconnell, top republican in the senate, as well as nancy pelosi, the top democrat in the house. now coming out of the meeting with senator reid, i'm not getting much at the moment from sources but one democratic aide tells me the following. he says that we -- this aide told me, we're all on the same page today. it's more about republicans. that goes without saying, because these negotiations really were focusing on the negotiations between the white house and speaker boehner, even before the meeting, which the treasury secretary and speaker boehner, a spokesman gave us this following statement, ashleigh. i want to read to you. he says, we accepted this meeting with the expectation that the white house team will bring a specific plan for real spending cuts, because spending cuts that washington democrats will accept is what is missing from the balanced approach that the president says he wants. clearly, what that tells me, republicans are putting the ball in the white house's court, and democrats' court to come forward with spending
what is really going on behind the scenes, which is real negotiating. so i asked that question of john boehner, who has been through this kind of negotiating many, many times over many years, if that's what we're seeing or if we're at a stalemate. listen to this . the past 24 hours, is this the necessary public posturing that needs to go on to get an endgame or is there serious stalemate right now? >> there is a stalemate. let's not kid ourselves. i'm not trying to make this more difficult, but if you watched me over the last three weeks, i've been very girded in what i have to say because i don't want to make it harder for me or the president or members of both parties to be able to find common ground. but when i come out the day after the election, and make it clear that republicans will put revenue on the table, i took a great risk. and then the white house spends three weeks trying to develop a proposal and they send one up here, they didn't want to have this extra spending that is actually greater than the amount they're willing to cut. i mean, it is -- it was not a serious propos
to avoid the fiscal cliff. but republican house speaker john boehner dismisses it as, and i'm quoting, la la land. the republicans offered their proposal, that happened about 24 hours ago. the white house quickly labels it as nothing new. business as usual, right? so how do we move beyond this stalemate in washington? we heard from the president, just a short time ago. our chief white house correspondent jessica yellin joins me now, jessica, the president spoke out, sat down in an interview with bloomberg tv, and in listening to the interview, did you hear any clues toward a possible compromise here? >> reporter: not new clues, brooke. the president laid down the marker that we heard from the white house consistently, which is they aren't moving until they hear the republicans agree to raise tax rates on the wealthiest. listen to what the president had to say. >> i think that, you know, we have the potential of getting a deal done, but it is going to require what i talked about during the campaign, which is a balanced responsible approach to deficit reduction that can help give businesses
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5